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Isaac Hale Daily Herald 

Billy Dean smiles after finishing a song during the final night of a memorial concert for fallen Provo police officer Joseph Shinners held Friday, Jan. 3, 2020, at the Covey Center for the Arts in Provo. The primary purpose of the concert, which took place Thursday and Friday evenings, was to raise $85,000 to send the Shinners family as well as roughly 40 Provo police officers to Washington D.C. to take part in National Police Week held in May of this year where Shinners will be honored along with other fallen officers, according to Provo Police Sgt. Nisha King. “It's been neat to see how much our community has come together and how supportive our community is,” said King, also remarking at the widespread support the Shinners family and Provo Police Department have gotten from other law enforcement agencies. In addition to the concert, an in-person raffle as well as an online raffle, both comprised of donated items from companies, businesses and individuals, were held to raise funds for the cause. So far, King approximated that $40,000 has been raised from the concert, raffles, and other associated fundraisers, and said that follow-up fundraising events are in the works. To bid in the online raffle ending Jan. 4 at 10pm, visit 32auctions.com/Shinners3310, and to donate money directly, visit the Provo Police Department’s Venmo page at @ProvoPolice, or a GoFundMe page titled “Send Provo PD to Shinners Memorial in D.C. 2020.” Isaac Hale, Daily Herald


Provo
featured
Memorial concert held for fallen Provo police officer Joseph Shinners

A memorial concert for fallen Provo police officer Joseph Shinners was held Thursday and Friday evenings at the Covey Center for the Arts in Provo.

The primary purpose of the concert was to raise $85,000 to send the Shinners family as well as roughly 40 Provo police officers to Washington, D.C., to take part in National Police Week held in May of this year where Shinners will be honored along with other fallen officers, according to Provo Police Sgt. Nisha King.

“It’s been neat to see how much our community has come together and how supportive our community is,” said King, also remarking at the widespread support the Shinners family and Provo Police Department have gotten from other law enforcement agencies.

In addition to the concert, an in-person raffle as well as an online raffle — both comprised of donated items from companies, businesses and individuals — were held to raise funds for the cause. So far, King approximated that $40,000 has been raised from the concert, raffles, and other associated fundraisers, and said that follow-up fundraising events are in the works.

To bid in the online raffle ending at 10 p.m. on Saturday, visit http://32auctions.com/Shinners3310. To donate money directly, visit the Provo Police Department’s Venmo page at @ProvoPolice, or a GoFundMe page titled “Send Provo PD to Shinners Memorial in D.C. 2020.”


Faith
featured
LDS President Russell M. Nelson gives special invitation on bicentennial of First Vision

On New Year’s Day, President Russell M. Nelson used his social media accounts to encourage members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints to up their missionary game. The message is in preparation for celebrating the bicentennial of the First Vision.

In the history of the church, 2020 marks the bicentennial of Joseph Smith’s First Vision in which Smith said he saw God and his son, Jesus Christ. The significance of the event for members of the church is part of a basic belief and doctrine they adhere to of God and Christ being two separate and distinct individuals.

“This is a hinge point in the history of the Church and your part is vital,” Nelson said.

This is not the first time Nelson has used the term hinge point in discussing the future of the church. Just under a year ago, at the dedication of the Rome Temple, the same term was used.

When asked about the opportunity to have the full First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve Apostles present for the Rome temple dedication last spring — something that has never happened before — Nelson said, “I think the Lord is pleased. He wanted it done that way. It will be a blessing for the people all over the world. Because these apostles now will go all over the world and recount the experiences that they have felt here as this holy house was dedicated.”

Nelson added at the time, “This is a hinge point in the history of the Church. Things are going to move forward at an accelerated pace of which this is a part. We think the Church is an old Church. It’s 189 years old. But it’s only the beginning. Just project out what the next future will be and the Church is going to have an unprecedented future. Unparalleled. We’re just building up to what’s ahead now.”

Since that hinge point reference last spring, the First Presidency and Quorum of the Twelve has visited numerous countries, kings, presidents, rulers and magistrates and have picked up the pace in sharing the gospel message with thousands.

Nelson is now asking individual members to do the same thing.

“When I spoke during last October’s general conference, I designated 2020 as a bicentennial period commemorating 200 years since God the Father and His Beloved Son, Jesus Christ, appeared to Joseph Smith in a vision,” Nelson said on social media. “That singular event in human history initiated the restoration of the Lord’s gospel – an unfolding Restoration that continues today.”

Nelson laid out a plan prior to the April General Conference, inviting members to be a major part of sharing the message of the ongoing restoration, reading Joseph Smith’s account of the First Vision as recorded in the Pearl of Great Price, a book of canonized scripture of the church and to ask themselves how that knowledge has changed their life.

Nelson added there would be more information on this subject in the coming days but to get started now.


SKIP PETERSON, Associated Press 

BYU's Tyler Haws celebrates in the first half of a first-round NCAA tournament game against Mississippi on Tuesday in Dayton, Ohio. 


Govt-and-politics
featured
Utah County Republican Party settles lawsuit alleging violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act

The Utah County Republican Party and Utah Republican Party settled a lawsuit filed by two party members who allege the groups violated the Americans with Disabilities Act, or ADA, by not reasonably accommodating their disabilities.

As part of the settlement, which was entered on Tuesday, the Utah Republican Party said it will update “its governing documents to reflect that ADA compliance is mandated for its political caucuses and conventions.”

In 2016, Aaron Heineman, who is deaf, tried to arrange for an American Sign Language, or ASL, interpreter to attend a local caucus so he could participate and give prepared remarks, according to the lawsuit filed in the U.S. District Court.

The county GOP planned to have an interpreter from Interwest Interpreting Agency attend but canceled after the precinct chair said they had arranged for other interpreters to be there, the lawsuit said.

When Heineman arrived to the meeting on March 22, there were no interpreters present. Another participant attempted to interpret for Heineman as he gave his speech, but he lacked proficiency in ASL and struggled to translate, according to the lawsuit. Without an adequate interpreter to help him track the time of his speech, he went over the two-minute time limit and was cut off.

“Mr. Heineman’s unfortunate experience at the caucus substantially impaired his ability to engage in political speech and participate in the political process,” the lawsuit said.

Another plaintiff in the case, Eliza Stauffer, said she attended the April 23 Utah Republican Party State Convention as a delegate. Stauffer, who uses a wheelchair, alleged there were no designated seating areas for individuals with a disability.

During the convention, a “stand-up” vote was called for a resolution, prompting Stauffer and others to object because they were unable to stand. Still, a stand-up vote was taken, the lawsuit alleged.

“This decision led to the disenfranchisement of all delegates with a disability who were unable to stand,” the lawsuit said.

The settlement stipulates that the state and county Republican parties will not call for standing votes “without a reasonable accommodation” and “will include ADA training in its preparation for the upcoming caucus and conventions for the 2020 election cycle.”

Additionally, the defendants agreed to pay Heineman and Stauffer’s legal counsel $15,000.

Stewart Peay, who is chair of the Utah County Republican Party, said the party wants people of all abilities to feel included and have their accommodations met.

“We want to make sure that all people, all Republicans, know that they are able to participate in the political process,” Peay said.

Utah Republican Party chair Derek Brown said encouraging participation in caucuses, conventions and other political events is “one of our primary objectives.”

“We will be doing everything that we can to make sure that individuals with disabilities are welcome and that they are fully participating in everything that takes place in these meetings,” Brown said.

The Utah Association of the Deaf was named as a plaintiff in the lawsuit. The group’s president, Kim Smith, called the settlement a “victory” that “solidifies the right of Deaf people to be provided with full access to effective communications.”

“We hope that this settlement agreement will serve as a model for other Utah political parties and political parties across the United States to allow members of the Deaf community to participate in future elections,” Smith said in a written statement.

“This is a nationwide problem,” said Jared Allebest, an attorney who represented Heineman and Stauffer. “It’s not a problem in just Utah alone.”


State-and-regional
UDOT finalizing long range rural road plan, millions to be spent in Northern Utah

OGDEN — With one of the highest population growth rates in the nation, much of Utah’s future expansion is expected in major cities along the Wasatch Front.

And while the Utah Department of Transportation has multiple large projects, current and future, aimed to address growth along the state’s most populated corridor, the agency is also keeping an eye on the periphery.

UDOT is currently working on the Statewide Rural Long-Range Transportation Plan. The plan provides a framework for decisions about future roadway improvements and funding allocations through 2050 in rural parts of the state. The LRP is also part of the state’s Unified Transportation Plan, which connects transportation projects across both the urban and rural parts of Utah.

As the state’s popularity as a recreation destination continues to increase, particularly at Utah’s five national parks, increased travel demand and congestion is headed for some of the state’s rural areas, according to LRP planning documents. Updated every four years, UDOT officials say the rural plan involves carefully considering context and vision for individual communities.

The plan identifies potential projects in three 10-year phases — with Phase 1 running from 2019 to 2030, Phase 2 from 2031 to 2040, and Phase 3 from 2041 2050. UDOT worked with partners, stakeholders and the public to identify projects in the plan. Groups outside of UDOT with an interest in the environment, the economy or individual communities were also involved.

Phase One of the plan includes nearly $80 million worth of work on Interstates 15 and 84 in rural Northern Utah areas.

The state wants to widen I-84 westbound near Rattlesnake pass in Snowville for $6.5 million. Eastbound I-84 would be widened in the same general area, which would include two new concrete bridges. That project is expected to cost $27.3 million. State Route 66 in Morgan would be widened to its intersection with I-84 for $9.8 million.

Meanwhile, Phase 1 of the plan calls for I-15 in Honeyville to be widened in both directions for more than $32 million.

Phase 2 of the plan calls for a $33 million reconstruction of State Route 39 as it traverses through the Ogden Canyon. The project would improve shoulders and install an “active transportation” component for cyclists and pedestrians. Another section of I-15 in Honeyville would be widened in Phase 2, costing $77 million.

The only significant Northern Utah project in Phase 3 involves a $66 million widening of State Route 167, also known as the Trappers Loop Highway, from I-84 to SR-39.

UDOT is expected to have the plan finalized sometime early this year.