[ {"id":"e78505be-917f-5714-84ca-3b837d5da6c0","type":"article","starttime":"1610631000","starttime_iso8601":"2021-01-14T06:30:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Guest opinion: Freedom and democracy come with corresponding duties","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/article_e78505be-917f-5714-84ca-3b837d5da6c0.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-freedom-and-democracy-come-with-corresponding-duties/article_e78505be-917f-5714-84ca-3b837d5da6c0.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-freedom-and-democracy-come-with-corresponding-duties/article_e78505be-917f-5714-84ca-3b837d5da6c0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Debra Oaks Coe","prologue":"After every election, there are large numbers of people disappointed with the candidate that won. This is the inherent nature of our democracy. This last presidential election was unique due to claims of massive voter fraud. More than 50 cases went to various courts yet no massive voter fraud was found. These false claims eventually resulted in an act of terror and loss of lives as a mob stormed our Capitol in an unprecedented attack.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["democracy","government","constitution","politics","fraud","candidate","mob","voter"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"7788a390-87d1-56c0-b48b-20d571359afd","description":"Debra Coe","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"262","height":"371","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/78/7788a390-87d1-56c0-b48b-20d571359afd/5fff7cdb037c0.image.jpg?resize=262%2C371"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"142","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/78/7788a390-87d1-56c0-b48b-20d571359afd/5fff7cdb037c0.image.jpg?resize=100%2C142"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"425","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/78/7788a390-87d1-56c0-b48b-20d571359afd/5fff7cdb037c0.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1450","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/78/7788a390-87d1-56c0-b48b-20d571359afd/5fff7cdb037c0.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"e78505be-917f-5714-84ca-3b837d5da6c0","body":"

After every election, there are large numbers of people disappointed with the candidate that won. This is the inherent nature of our democracy. This last presidential election was unique due to claims of massive voter fraud. More than 50 cases went to various courts yet no massive voter fraud was found. These false claims eventually resulted in an act of terror and loss of lives as a mob stormed our Capitol in an unprecedented attack.

Surprisingly, many in that mob claimed to support our Constitution. A mob storming the Capitol to pressure Congress to put in the candidate of their choice against the will of the voters is a clear betrayal of our Constitution. Just the day before, passengers on a flight from Utah to Washington D.C. berated Utah Senator Mitt Romney by chanting \u201ctraitor\u201d due to his statement a few days earlier about the Electoral College ballots and his support of our Democratic Republic. Clearly, there is a lack of understanding about what our Constitutional election process is, and how our form of democracy works.

Each of the freedoms we enjoy comes with a corresponding duty. A principal duty is to have a basic understanding of our Constitution and work to uphold it. Utah Senator Mike Lee pointed out in his short speech Wednesday evening, that what the mob wanted Congress to do was unconstitutional and beyond the powers given members of Congress.

Freedom of the press is critical. Journalists are our eyes and ears for what is happening around the country. We have the duty to seek truth when choosing our news sources. This is a more complicated process than many realize. While some people intentionally give misinformation when they do not like the facts, most do not intentionally mislead. But all people have their bias in how they interpret what has happened. We need to be aware of the bias, right- or left-leaning, in all news sources. All of us should access a variety of news sources with varying biases to have a more balanced view. We need to recognize the difference between factual news stories and news opinion pieces.

Sen. Romney said, \u201cThe best way we (political leaders) can show respect for the voters who are upset is by telling them the truth. That is the burden, and the duty, of leadership.\u201d

Sadly, not all leaders speak the truth. Belief and what we wish was true can never be more important than the facts. Several key elements of a dictatorship are propaganda, suppression or lack of a free press and misinformation. One of the fastest ways to destroy democracy is for people to believe false information based on political ambition.

A key element of our democracy is the separation of powers between the different branches and levels of government. Only part of the power is given to the federal government. The rest is divided between state and local governments. This is called Federalism. Rep. John Curtis recently issued a statement explaining that Federalism is a core principle of our country and an important piece of that is respecting each state\u2019s election procedures and outcomes. The Constitution grants Congress the specific authority to count the electoral votes, not debate the merits of each state\u2019s election laws or the validity of the electors they choose.

In his defining Gettysburg Address, Abraham Lincoln dedicated that battlefield to the living that we might take increased devotion to give new birth to freedom and assure \u201cthat government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the Earth.\u201d

I am grateful to my members of Congress for preserving freedom at a crucial moment.

"}, {"id":"6907986e-73f2-5bca-91ab-2d847071752d","type":"article","starttime":"1610026200","starttime_iso8601":"2021-01-07T06:30:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Guest opinion: A Spanish Fork girl's 1951 polio virus journal has relevance today","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/article_6907986e-73f2-5bca-91ab-2d847071752d.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-a-spanish-fork-girls-1951-polio-virus-journal-has-relevance-today/article_6907986e-73f2-5bca-91ab-2d847071752d.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-a-spanish-fork-girls-1951-polio-virus-journal-has-relevance-today/article_6907986e-73f2-5bca-91ab-2d847071752d.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Randall Thacker","prologue":"Shortly after Thanksgiving of 1951, my mother, Myrna Nielson Thacker, contracted the polio virus. She had spent the long weekend with extended family and doing Christmas shopping in Salt Lake. Upon returning to Spanish Fork, she experienced flu-like symptoms, a high fever, numbness and stiffness in her feet and legs, and excruciating pain in her back. Within a few days, she was paralyzed from the waist down.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["polio","coronavirus","medicine","anatomy","hospital","iron lung","symptom","virus","flu","vaccine"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"bf1cea53-ebd5-53a1-944f-d724c43d1b12","description":"On Dec. 15, Intermountain Healthcare administered its first COVID-19 vaccinations to frontline workers at the LDS Hospital in Salt Lake City.\u00a0Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare","byline":"Courtesy of Intermountain Healthcare","hireswidth":6720,"hiresheight":4480,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f1/bf1cea53-ebd5-53a1-944f-d724c43d1b12/5fd9567b5c07c.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1763","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f1/bf1cea53-ebd5-53a1-944f-d724c43d1b12/5fd9567b47e6b.image.jpg?resize=1763%2C1175"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f1/bf1cea53-ebd5-53a1-944f-d724c43d1b12/5fd9567b47e6b.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f1/bf1cea53-ebd5-53a1-944f-d724c43d1b12/5fd9567b47e6b.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/b/f1/bf1cea53-ebd5-53a1-944f-d724c43d1b12/5fd9567b47e6b.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"6907986e-73f2-5bca-91ab-2d847071752d","body":"

Shortly after Thanksgiving of 1951, my mother, Myrna Nielson Thacker, contracted the polio virus. She had spent the long weekend with extended family and doing Christmas shopping in Salt Lake. Upon returning to Spanish Fork, she experienced flu-like symptoms, a high fever, numbness and stiffness in her feet and legs, and excruciating pain in her back. Within a few days, she was paralyzed from the waist down.

Polio was the pandemic of the early 1950s and like the coronavirus, many of those infected had little or no symptoms. Yet for about 1% of infections it entered the central nervous system and in 1 of 1000 cases it progressed to paralysis. Simple flu-like symptoms during those years created fear that you had the virus and if severe, it could result in paralysis or even death. My mother was one of four known polio cases on her street in Spanish Fork and one of the severe paralytic cases.

She kept detailed journal entries about her experience from which you read that similar to the coronavirus, everyone was learning in real-time. The doctors, nurses, therapists and scientists were in a continual process of discovery, working to identify new ways to best help patients while waiting for a vaccine. Reading her words provides a clear look and feel into the mind and heart of a young teenage girl enduring an extraordinary challenge caused by a terrible virus, full of uncertainty for what would lie ahead.

Upon being diagnosed by their Spanish Fork doctor, her parents took her to Salt Lake City. They were in such a hurry they were pulled over for speeding. As the story goes, my grandfather told the policeman that he was taking his daughter into Salt Lake because she had polio. The policeman immediately told him that he would escort them the rest of the way to the hospital.

Temporary polio isolation units, like those we\u2019ve seen erected in some coronavirus hot spots, were common in many cities throughout the United States. She was taken to the Salt Lake County Hospital polio isolation ward that was located on the corner of 2100 South and State Street where the Salt Lake County Administrative offices are today. Like the concern for contagion today, she had to dispose of all her belongings and any visits were severely limited or not allowed.

For a young girl, the isolation and paralysis were overwhelming. She wrote that she could hardly sleep very much during the night. Yet, she noticed a burning light bulb in the hallway that became a comfort to her and as she described, \u201ctaught me how important light is in lifting our spirits. It gave me something to focus on instead of the pain.\u201d The coronavirus has created isolation for both the sick and the healthy, forcing all of us to look for greater light to get us through these hard times.

Like COVID, polio greatly affected the lungs. Outside her door sat an iron lung, a great big tank 6 feet long on legs, open at one end. The nurse would slide a patient in, feet-first, on a stretcher, and the whole body would be enclosed, except for the head. The iron lung helped the polio patient to breathe. Fortunately, she never needed it, but dozens of other patients there did, some never fully regaining the ability to breathe on their own and eventually dying.

Polio was around for centuries but didn\u2019t reach pandemic proportions until the early to mid-1900s, and a vaccine wasn\u2019t developed until 1955. We are fortunate that vaccines have been developed so quickly for the coronavirus. We can learn a lot from the stories of polio survivors, like my mother, who lived through an earlier pandemic, and despite all the death and suffering, became strong and resilient human beings.

"}, {"id":"f52d1f7a-6068-5f76-a086-e4bfcfe47052","type":"article","starttime":"1609768800","starttime_iso8601":"2021-01-04T07:00:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"opinion":"news/opinion"},{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Dimond: Be charitable but also be careful","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/article_f52d1f7a-6068-5f76-a086-e4bfcfe47052.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/dimond-be-charitable-but-also-be-careful/article_f52d1f7a-6068-5f76-a086-e4bfcfe47052.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/dimond-be-charitable-but-also-be-careful/article_f52d1f7a-6068-5f76-a086-e4bfcfe47052.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Diane Dimond","prologue":"MacKenzie Scott has achieved what no other philanthropist has. With no massive Gates Foundation-like staff to assist her, she sought out some of the neediest charitable groups in the nation and donated nearly $6 billion to them. Six billion dollars. Think of that. Think of how much good can be achieved by the beneficiaries: food banks, social service programs, civil rights groups, colleges and universities. The United Way, Goodwill, Easterseals, the NAACP and the YWCA organizations were also among those receiving Scott\u2019s surprise donations.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["mackenzie scott","navigator","search","internet","computer science","software","naacp","ywca","federal trade commission","charity"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"f8391dcf-57cf-5f7d-8e3e-c9d23b3f9066","description":"Diane Dimond","byline":"","hireswidth":1857,"hiresheight":2850,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/83/f8391dcf-57cf-5f7d-8e3e-c9d23b3f9066/58a23b67e2e4d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1162","height":"1783","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/83/f8391dcf-57cf-5f7d-8e3e-c9d23b3f9066/5ff22c1abccdd.image.jpg?resize=1162%2C1783"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"153","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/83/f8391dcf-57cf-5f7d-8e3e-c9d23b3f9066/5ff22c1abccdd.image.jpg?resize=100%2C153"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"460","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/83/f8391dcf-57cf-5f7d-8e3e-c9d23b3f9066/5ff22c1abccdd.image.jpg?resize=300%2C460"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1571","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/83/f8391dcf-57cf-5f7d-8e3e-c9d23b3f9066/5ff22c1abccdd.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C1571"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"f52d1f7a-6068-5f76-a086-e4bfcfe47052","body":"

MacKenzie Scott has achieved what no other philanthropist has. With no massive Gates Foundation-like staff to assist her, she sought out some of the neediest charitable groups in the nation and donated nearly $6 billion to them.

Six billion dollars. Think of that. Think of how much good can be achieved by the beneficiaries: food banks, social service programs, civil rights groups, colleges and universities. The United Way, Goodwill, Easterseals, the NAACP and the YWCA organizations were also among those receiving Scott\u2019s surprise donations.

Where did Scott get so much money? After 25 years of marriage to billionaire Jeff Bezos, the couple divorced, and she received more than $38 billion in shares of Amazon stock, a company she helped her husband create. Scott has vowed to give away half her fortune, which has now grown to more than $60 billion.

It\u2019s highly unlikely anyone reading this will ever have that kind of money, but it doesn\u2019t mean we can\u2019t be charitable. And, in fact, we have been. Even in this exhausting and confounding year of the pandemic, Americans continue to prove they are a giving people.

The Philanthropy News Digest reports that charitable giving trends for 2020 are on track to beat 2019 donations. For example, statistics from 2,500 nonprofits from around the country show charitable giving increased 12% in the second quarter of this year. Americans who donated less than $250 jumped more than 19%. Those who gave $1,000 or more jumped almost 6.5%.

This is proof positive that following the COVID-19 emergency declaration in March, many of us did not simply hunker down and forget about the outside world. Lots of citizens headed for their checkbooks to help those in need.

Today our mailboxes and email accounts are filled with end-of-the-year pleas from all sorts of charities designed to pull at your heartstrings and add to your tax deductions before the new year. But remember, \u2018tis also the season for scams. Catastrophic events, such as a worldwide pandemic, tend to bring out the most creative criminal minds intent on separating you from your money.

The FBI warns that if an organization is asking you donate with cash, a gift card or by wire transfer, it is probably a scam. It\u2019s suggested you only donate by traceable credit card or checks.

The bureau also preaches \u201cgood cyber hygiene\u201d and advises to always check a charity\u2019s website address closely. Most legit organizations have at the end of their URL \u201c.org,\u201d not \u201c.com.\u201d And never click on links or open email attachments from unfamiliar groups asking for money. That could immediately infect your computer.

The Federal Trade Commission urges citizens to do a quick bit of research before donating money. Scammers often make up names that sound like the names of genuine charities. (The words \u201cchildren,\u201d \u201cveteran\u201d or \u201cwounded warrior\u201d are frequently misappropriated.)

So, the FTC suggests a simple web search of the group\u2019s name plus the words \u201ccomplaint,\u201d \u201crating\u201d or \u201cscam.\u201d Also, keep a record of your donation, and make sure you were only charged the amount you intended rather than a recurring donation.

To be extra careful, refer to charity watchdog groups such as Charity Navigator or CharityWatch. Both of these nonprofit organizations have an easy search function where potential donors can insert a charity\u2019s name and see how efficiently and effectively they spend their donations. Charity Navigator, for example, recommends that only 25% of a charity\u2019s funds be spent on administrative costs. Seventy-five percent should go toward the group\u2019s stated mission.

A recently revealed case in point: After the explosion of the #MeToo movement, a group of Hollywood producers and celebrities established the Time\u2019s Up organization in 2018. It was designed to fight sexual harassment and provide a legal defense fund to help victims seek justice. But, according to its own tax filings, Time\u2019s Up spent 38% on staff salaries and hundreds of thousands more on fancy conferences, advertising, public relations, travel and other nonmission activities.

It should be noted that Charity Navigator has not rated Time\u2019s Up or its lobbying arm, Time\u2019s Up Now. The CharityWatch site links to a scathing Hollywood Reporter article about the financial excesses of the outside \u201cambassador\u201d consultants it recommends.

Bottom line: Be charitable, but be careful.

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Like Sherlock Holmes\u2019 dog that didn\u2019t bark in the night, so goes in politics: uncharacteristic behavior can turn out to be crucially significant \u2014 uncharacteristic behavior in politics being defined as one demographic group unexpectedly trending one way when most of the electorate trends the other.

Such behavior was the subject of The New York Times\u2019 graphic team\u2019s report headlined \u201cImmigrant Neighborhoods Shifted Red as the Country Chose Blue.\u201d

Readers scrolling down through the story encounter maps of metropolitan Chicago, Miami, Orlando, Houston, San Antonio, Philadelphia, New York, Los Angeles, San Jose and Phoenix, plus the Rio Grande Valley, with Latino and Asian neighborhoods clearly marked.

Red arrows show election precincts that have shifted right since the 2016 election. Blue arrows sometimes show increased Democratic margins in areas with mostly affluent white voters.

The story highlights that the big Trump increases in the Miami area are people of Cuban descent \u2014 a trend so large and so pivotal in giving Trump Florida\u2019s 29 electoral votes that it was noticed on election night. But what was considered an exception turns out to have been a particularly vivid example of the rule.

Trump still didn\u2019t carry most heavily Hispanic areas. But he got big percentage increases in almost all of them, from Los Angeles to the Rio Grande Valley to New York\u2019s upper Manhattan and the Bronx.

And, though it was not noticed at all right after the election, Trump also made gains among Asians \u2014 Vietnamese in Orange County, California; people of Chinese descent in Silicon Valley and Brooklyn; South Asians and Arabs in Chicago\u2019s northern suburbs.

Almost nothing in preelection media coverage anticipated this countercyclical trend. One reason is that preelection polls typically understated Trump\u2019s support. Another is that subgroups in statewide polls have a big margin of error.

A third reason is that the mostly liberal press corps was confident that \u201cpeople of color\u201d were permanently alienated by Donald Trump\u2019s (usually unenumerated) \u201cracist\u201d remarks and his policies to restrict immigration.

Apparently, many voters of recent immigrant stock disagree. A large and increasing number apparently share Trump\u2019s view that heavy and often-illegal low-skill immigration has held down wages of people like them. Or they were convinced of that as immigration levels fell and low-credential workers\u2019 wages and incomes increased in 2017, 2018, 2019 and the first two months of 2020.

It may also be that new citizens don\u2019t see the United States as a nation whose central heritage is \u201csystemic racism,\u201d as The New York Times\u2019 1619 Project has insisted. Or that they haven\u2019t encountered discrimination and bigotry against \u201cpeople of color\u201d as their central and defining experience.

Fear of socialism, inspired by some Democratic candidates\u2019 calls for \u201cMedicare for All\u201d and the Green New Deal, may have played a role. More than most Americans, many Hispanic and Asian voters know how socialist regimes in Latin America and East Asia have restricted liberty and stifled economic growth. Asians especially may have watched China\u2019s clampdowns on Hong Kong and Xinjiang.

Governments\u2019 responses to the two major events of 2020 \u2014 the COVID-19 lockdowns and the \u201cmostly peaceful\u201d Black Lives Matter protests \u2014 may have differently impacted immigrants and the upscale whites in nearby affluent neighborhoods.

Gentry liberals have mostly been able to work from home offices or move to their summer homes, and they are mostly insulated against the sharply increased number of post-Memorial Day homicides and violent attacks.

Voters in heavy immigrant neighborhoods, in contrast, have been more likely to lose their jobs, to have their kids barred from school and to be at risk of violent crimes. Democratic governors\u2019 and mayors\u2019 lockdowns, Democratic teacher unions\u2019 demands for school closings and Democratic politicians\u2019 calls for defunding the police may not sound like such good ideas to them.

In the short run, immigrant voters\u2019 move toward Trump didn\u2019t prevent the election of Joe Biden (though it reduced his margin of victory in the three crucial states to 42,918 votes). But in the long run, it points toward a fracturing of the \u201cemerging Democratic majority\u201d predicted in Ruy Teixeira and John Judis\u2019s 2004 book and effectuated by former President Barack Obama\u2019s 2008 victory.

That was a top-and-bottom coalition of gentry liberals and \u201cpeople of color,\u201d together with a remnant of blue-collar union members. That last group moved toward Donald Trump in 2016 and moved only a bit toward Democrats this year. Now, as The Times\u2019 article and graphics show, Hispanics and Asians and, to a lesser extent, blacks are voting like the \u201cpeople of color\u201d of 2008.

So, Democratic strategists, reports the Washington Post, \u201cworry about the potential emergence of a mostly male and increasingly interracial working-class coalition for Republicans that will cut into the demographic advantages Democrats had long counted on.\u201d

Sounds like they\u2019ve heard the dog not barking in the night.

"}, {"id":"e09eff42-51c8-503d-b59e-dcab2e05c002","type":"article","starttime":"1608730200","starttime_iso8601":"2020-12-23T06:30:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Guest opinion: The gift of forgiveness","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/article_e09eff42-51c8-503d-b59e-dcab2e05c002.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-the-gift-of-forgiveness/article_e09eff42-51c8-503d-b59e-dcab2e05c002.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-the-gift-of-forgiveness/article_e09eff42-51c8-503d-b59e-dcab2e05c002.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Dr. Susan R. Madsen","prologue":"This holiday season, the world is in desperate need of healing, from our health to the economy to politics. And while we may feel powerless as individuals to solve these big issues, I believe there is a means for each of us to improve our personal and professional lives: the gift of forgiveness. Many years ago I encountered this insight from some management scholars: \u201cHumans working together have endless opportunities to offend or harm others, intentionally or unintentionally. An organization (or a family) is a melee of relationships alternating between firm and sound, unconnected, sordid, broken and angry, and changing.\u201d And some of the most important work we can all do is to heal broken, strained and ever-changing relationships. These actions can make a profound difference in our lives and the lives of others. Forgiveness is critical for anyone working with others in their homes, churches, schools, businesses or in the communities. It seems to me that this includes everyone.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["forgiveness","opportunity","work","company","economics","research","job","relationship"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"5119bf59-a914-5f62-9201-9bd26fb506d0","description":"Susan Madsen poses for a portrait in her Highland home.","byline":"Sammy Jo Hester, Daily Herald","hireswidth":3000,"hiresheight":2000,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/5119bf59-a914-5f62-9201-9bd26fb506d0/5eb1a2d65bd2f.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1763","height":"1175","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/5119bf59-a914-5f62-9201-9bd26fb506d0/5f21e7c750a65.image.jpg?resize=1763%2C1175"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"67","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/5119bf59-a914-5f62-9201-9bd26fb506d0/5f21e7c750a65.image.jpg?resize=100%2C67"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"200","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/5119bf59-a914-5f62-9201-9bd26fb506d0/5f21e7c750a65.image.jpg?resize=300%2C200"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"682","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/5/11/5119bf59-a914-5f62-9201-9bd26fb506d0/5f21e7c750a65.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C682"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"e09eff42-51c8-503d-b59e-dcab2e05c002","body":"

This holiday season, the world is in desperate need of healing, from our health to the economy to politics. And while we may feel powerless as individuals to solve these big issues, I believe there is a means for each of us to improve our personal and professional lives: the gift of forgiveness.

Many years ago I encountered this insight from some management scholars: \u201cHumans working together have endless opportunities to offend or harm others, intentionally or unintentionally. An organization (or a family) is a melee of relationships alternating between firm and sound, unconnected, sordid, broken and angry, and changing.\u201d And some of the most important work we can all do is to heal broken, strained and ever-changing relationships. These actions can make a profound difference in our lives and the lives of others. Forgiveness is critical for anyone working with others in their homes, churches, schools, businesses or in the communities. It seems to me that this includes everyone.

First, let\u2019s discuss the personal benefits of letting things go. An article I coauthored years ago cites dozens of studies that have found that more forgiving people tend to have better physical health, decreased blood pressure, fewer physician visits, lower stress, better healing from pain and illness, increased personal happiness, reduced anxiety and depression, and increased compassion.

From a job performance stance, research has discovered potential connections between forgiveness and productivity after downsizing, higher morale and satisfaction, willingness to cooperate and greater social capital. When team members are bitter or hold grudges or resentment, job performance has been shown to decrease and there is an increase in disagreements, hurtful rumors, inaccurate performance appraisals, ethical and legal issues, unjust employment decisions, lack of support for initiatives, acts of retaliation, workplace violence, bullying, and anger and resentment.

The bottom line is that unforgiving individuals and organizational cultures can lead to lower levels of performance and increased mental and physical problems. So, what can be done to support a more compassionate culture? The following three research-based recommendations should provide some helpful ideas to promote healing:

1. Talk about conflict resolution and communication. Seminars and workshops that focus on things like values, character, conflict management and communication skills can raise awareness. For example, USU Extension offers various programs that do just this. Similarly, openly addressing conflict resolution in our personal lives can help us move forward and work toward creating a culture of forgiveness. Conflict is inevitable, but it is what we do or don\u2019t do to resolve it that matters most. As we increase our understanding of self and others, we are more likely to forgive.

2. Use writing and journaling to process events. These can be effective activities to aid in conflict management and interpersonal communication at work and at home. People who express their thoughts and feelings through writing seem to process situations more accurately and objectively, no matter the setting.

3. Service and giving. When we think beyond ourselves, we tend to be more considerate and forgiving. Organizations that focus on corporate social responsibility tend to encourage cultures of care and community engagement, activities that promote patience and forgiveness. Families find bonding as they serve those around them.

The world feels upside down right now. I believe that if we all reach deep within ourselves and find ways to be more forgiving, we\u2019ll be better equipped to rebuild our families, companies and economies in sustainable ways. And, as we provide opportunities for others to live and work in forgiving cultures, they will increasingly thrive \u2014 and that is just what we will need to heal in upcoming months and years!

"}, {"id":"14d59e8f-b77d-5a77-bbdc-c2255436b8c0","type":"article","starttime":"1608559200","starttime_iso8601":"2020-12-21T07:00:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"opinion":"news/opinion"},{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Barone: Identity politics remain in office under Biden administration","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/article_14d59e8f-b77d-5a77-bbdc-c2255436b8c0.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/barone-identity-politics-remain-in-office-under-biden-administration/article_14d59e8f-b77d-5a77-bbdc-c2255436b8c0.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/barone-identity-politics-remain-in-office-under-biden-administration/article_14d59e8f-b77d-5a77-bbdc-c2255436b8c0.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Michael Barone","prologue":"Identity politics seems to be sticking around. Important election results seemed to refute the notion that Americans vote for their ethnic or racial identity. Hispanic voters trended significantly toward the supposedly anti-Hispanic Donald Trump, and Californians, while voting 63% for Joe Biden, rejected racial quotas and preferences in a referendum by an even larger margin than in the 1990s.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["joe biden","electoral college","donald trump","democrats","politics","ministries","outcome","lawsuit"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":900,"hiresheight":1359,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/58898a2c20a82.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"900","height":"1359","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg?resize=900%2C1359"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"151","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg?resize=100%2C151"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"453","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg?resize=300%2C453"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1546","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"14d59e8f-b77d-5a77-bbdc-c2255436b8c0","body":"

Identity politics seems to be sticking around.

Important election results seemed to refute the notion that Americans vote for their ethnic or racial identity. Hispanic voters trended significantly toward the supposedly anti-Hispanic Donald Trump, and Californians, while voting 63% for Joe Biden, rejected racial quotas and preferences in a referendum by an even larger margin than in the 1990s.

But Joe Biden, even as the Supreme Court rejected the last pro-Trump lawsuit and the Electoral College confirmed his 306-232 majority, seemed to be playing identity politics with his major appointments.

\u201cIdentity-based groups,\u201d The New York Times is reporting, \u201ccontinue to lobby Mr. Biden to ensure racial and gender diversity at all levels of his administration.\u201d

He\u2019s facing demands for two Cabinet posts for \u201cLatinas,\u201d for a black attorney general and for a Native American interior secretary. He\u2019s facing criticism for placing \u201cpeople of color\u201d in posts for which they have no apparent expertise \u2014 Xavier Becerra at the Department of Health and Human Services, Susan Rice at the Domestic Policy Council.

Every incoming president faces vexing choices \u2014 and scornful criticism \u2014 but it\u2019s an especially vexing problem for Democrats. Their party, since its creation in 1832, has been an often-unwieldy coalition of out-groups with grievances and self-appointed advocates. Their urban political bosses developed the art of balancing party tickets dozens of decades ago.

The plaints and pleas of identity-group advocates can sometimes seem disconnected from reality. How many Hispanic-surnamed women out there are determined to renounce the Democratic Party unless Biden appoints to his Cabinet not just one but two Latinas (at least The Times isn\u2019t using the university-spawned and unpronounceable adjective \u201cLatinx\u201d)? Will black voters really feel betrayed if this Democratic president doesn\u2019t appoint a black attorney general as the last Democratic president did?

At this point in our history, it seems apparent that Americans will not only accept but also approve of appointees of any ethnic or racial description, depending on their performance and policies. And one suspects that among the public, if not in the press, most people care more about policy than ethnicity, more about competence than ticket balancing.

On that count, the Biden administration is shaping up to be less radical than Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and her squad may like, but also sharp-edged in its partisanship. Becerra\u2019s legal persecution of abortion opponents and Rice\u2019s willingness to advance falsehoods about the 2012 Benghazi attack are pertinent examples that could prove of greater importance than their racial classifications.

A sharp-edged partisan tone was also apparent in Joe Biden\u2019s mostly emollient remarks Dec. 14 during which he acknowledged his victory in the Electoral College.

\u201cIt\u2019s time to turn the page as we\u2019ve done throughout our history,\u201d Biden said, \u201cto unite, to heal.\u201d

He promised to \u201cbe president for all Americans.\u201d But he also took pains to rebuke Donald Trump and Republicans who have supported the Texas attorney general\u2019s lawsuit to overturn the results in four other states, rejected by an essentially unanimous Supreme Court.

Biden was right in disparaging that particular case and for noting that other pro-Trump lawsuits were not successful. But he was wrong to suggest that Trump\u2019s victory four years ago was accepted ungrudgingly by Democrats.

On the contrary, congressional Democrats then, on no more basis than the Texas attorney general had last week, challenged the Electoral College results. And Obama administration intelligence and law enforcement officials interfered in the political process during and after the campaign, continuing for years after Trump was inaugurated to advance the charge of collusion with Russia, for which no credible evidence has ever appeared.

Calls \u201cto work together to give each other a chance to lower the temperature\u201d are likely to prove unavailing absent a confession of error \u2014 an acknowledgement and apology \u2014 from those, including the president-elect, who denied the legitimacy of the man who was president-elect four years ago.

Acknowledgments and apologies should also be forthcoming from major press outlets and from Facebook and Twitter for suppressing what we now know was the valid New York Post story on Hunter Biden\u2019s misdeeds.

The Trump lawsuits failed to identify any wrongdoing that cost Trump electoral votes. But the largely successful suppression of those stories may have changed the outcome of the election, just as Obama-appointed FBI Director James Comey\u2019s late-in-the-campaign statement that reopened the Hillary Clinton email investigation may have changed the outcome in 2016.

But, hey, back to business as usual. There\u2019s no sign that acknowledgments, much less apologies, are forthcoming, while the identity politics cabinetmaking merrily continues.

"}, {"id":"1d066336-4031-5c2f-8968-40cebea8912c","type":"article","starttime":"1608125400","starttime_iso8601":"2020-12-16T06:30:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Guest opinion: Rights endowed by God, not government","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/article_1d066336-4031-5c2f-8968-40cebea8912c.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-rights-endowed-by-god-not-government/article_1d066336-4031-5c2f-8968-40cebea8912c.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-rights-endowed-by-god-not-government/article_1d066336-4031-5c2f-8968-40cebea8912c.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Bliss Tew","prologue":"Individual gun rights, where do they come from? Is a right the same as a government-granted permission or revocable privilege? Is a right merely a government revocable license? Should it be? In the American traditional understanding, particularly found in the Declaration of Independence, the Founding Fathers recognized \u201cthat all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.\u201d In other words, our RIGHTS are endowed upon us by our God, our creator and not by any government. So how does the right to be armed fit into this way of thinking. Simple logic.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["permit","weaponry","law","military","handgun","privilege","rifle","government","firearm","founding father"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0","description":"","byline":"Stock Photo","hireswidth":4928,"hiresheight":3264,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5da0a21a8960d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1769","height":"1172","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=1769%2C1172"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"678","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C678"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"1d066336-4031-5c2f-8968-40cebea8912c","body":"

Individual gun rights, where do they come from?

Is a right the same as a government-granted permission or revocable privilege? Is a right merely a government revocable license? Should it be?

In the American traditional understanding, particularly found in the Declaration of Independence, the Founding Fathers recognized \u201cthat all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness.\u201d In other words, our RIGHTS are endowed upon us by our God, our creator and not by any government. So how does the right to be armed fit into this way of thinking. Simple logic.

If God endowed you with your life as a right, then it follows that the same God, your creator, endowed you and every individual with the RIGHT (not revocable permission or mere privilege) to defend that sacred, God-given, individual life, right?

Thus, it follows logically that if you have a right from God, your maker, to defend your life, then you have also a God-given right to own (keep) and bear (carry) arms (i.e., pistols, rifles, knives, swords, axes, etc.) for your own self-defense of your life, health, property and even the innocents under your care (i.e., wife, children, siblings, parents). Their lives deserve protection from aggressors too, right? The Founding Fathers understood this.

In fact, the Founding Fathers used their private firearms to drive their oppressive king\u2019s armies out of their land, beginning at Lexington, Concord, Bunkers Hill, Breed\u2019s Hill, etc., didn\u2019t they? So, they had proven that tyranny could be conquered and freedom gained because they had retained and used their firearms and other arms to defend their God-given rights, their liberty, their property and gain for themselves, and their posterity their independence from the unrighteous dominion of a king turned dictator, a king that no longer protected their God-given rights, but instead who violated those rights.

Sixty-years-ago, when I was 8, my grandfather (a former Undersheriff of Bighorn County, Wyoming) gave a gift to me and my identical twin brother, a .22, single-shot, bolt-action rifle. He taught us to shoot it, to be safe with it, and to only use it until grown in the company of an adult like our father. We owned guns from that time forth and never abused our right.

It has been my experience in Utah that hundreds of thousands of Utahns own and even occasionally carry high-powered rifles, shotguns, pistols, and bows and arrows during various hunting seasons, or to target practice, or even just for self-defense, but they do not go forth to murder other humans, or to commit rape at the point of a weapon, or to rob banks, etc. No, these law-abiding, armed citizens are never to be feared. They are in fact armed all year long and their arms are used for lawful and moral pursuits, including in many cases self-defense.

Personally, I\u2019ve had a Concealed Firearm Permit since 1995 and carried a loaded handgun much of that time without committing any act of intimidation or criminal act with it, and I\u2019m just one of tens-of-thousands of other such permit holders. In my view, the only ones who should need a \u201cpermit\u201d from government to exercise a God-given right to be armed are those convicted of a crime or in government service.

We are the masters; the government is our servant. Don\u2019t forget that or you will slide under the tyranny of oppressive government that will disarm you. When government has a monopoly of deadly force, who has the power \u2014 government or citizens?

"}, {"id":"db5f0467-1330-5151-8a1e-55715b5a7e94","type":"article","starttime":"1607954400","starttime_iso8601":"2020-12-14T07:00:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"opinion":"news/opinion"},{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Barone: The unbearable lightness of white college Democrats","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/article_db5f0467-1330-5151-8a1e-55715b5a7e94.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/barone-the-unbearable-lightness-of-white-college-democrats/article_db5f0467-1330-5151-8a1e-55715b5a7e94.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/barone-the-unbearable-lightness-of-white-college-democrats/article_db5f0467-1330-5151-8a1e-55715b5a7e94.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Michael Barone","prologue":"Eighty-five percent of counties with a Whole Foods store voted for Joe Biden. That factoid, relayed by The Cook Political Report\u2019s David Wasserman, tells you something important about the election \u2014 and about today\u2019s Democratic Party. \u201cThe Democracy,\u201d as it was called in the 19th century, long thought of itself as the party of the people, the defender of the little guy, the side that stood up for the folks not able to stand up for themselves.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":[],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":900,"hiresheight":1359,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/58898a2c20a82.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"900","height":"1359","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg?resize=900%2C1359"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"151","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg?resize=100%2C151"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"453","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg?resize=300%2C453"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1546","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/86/d86d0134-c8ab-5713-a458-ee923159d2c1/5f14b8c6c3246.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":5,"commentID":"db5f0467-1330-5151-8a1e-55715b5a7e94","body":"

Eighty-five percent of counties with a Whole Foods store voted for Joe Biden. That factoid, relayed by The Cook Political Report\u2019s David Wasserman, tells you something important about the election \u2014 and about today\u2019s Democratic Party.

\u201cThe Democracy,\u201d as it was called in the 19th century, long thought of itself as the party of the people, the defender of the little guy, the side that stood up for the folks not able to stand up for themselves.

There was always something to this. From its formation to reelect Andrew Jackson in 1832, the Democratic Party has always been a coalition of groups not considered typical Americans but that together could form a national majority. Naturally, the precise composition of this coalition has changed over time.

Barack Obama\u2019s Democratic Party was a top-and-bottom coalition of those at both ends of the income, education and occupational scales. Obama, who, as an Illinois legislator, gerrymandered a top-and-bottom district for himself, provided substantive and psychological sustenance to both sides.

Joe Biden\u2019s Democratic Party has a different balance. The boy from working-class Scranton, as he is billed, ran best not in factory cities but in university towns.

His highest percentage in Michigan was in the county containing Ann Arbor, not Detroit. He ran stronger in Madison, Wisconsin\u2019s Dane County than in Milwaukee County; stronger in Iowa City than in Des Moines; stronger in Missoula, Montana, with its university than in Butte with its copper mines; just as strong in metro Columbus (Ohio State University) as in metro Cleveland.

Biden\u2019s strongest area in California was the San Francisco Bay (University of California, Berkeley and Stanford University). His strongest county in upstate New York was Tompkins (Cornell University). His strongest counties in North Carolina were Durham and Orange (Duke University and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill).

White college grads \u2014 Joel Kotkin\u2019s \u201cgentry liberals,\u201d Arnold Kling\u2019s \u201chighly educated elites\u201d \u2014 have become the dominant constituency in the Democratic Party. Even as the descendants of the party\u2019s blue-collar constituents have become Donald Trump Republicans, Democratic percentages among white college graduates have ballooned.

Pew Research Center polling showed white college graduates 50% to 42% Republican in 1994 \u2014 the breakthrough year when Republicans captured the House after 40 years of Democratic control \u2014 and 57% to 37% Democratic in 2019. That\u2019s happened even as they\u2019ve become a larger percentage of the electorate.

To which an old-time Democratic Party boss \u2014 Tammany Hall\u2019s Charles F. Murphy or Chicago\u2019s Richard J. Daley \u2014 would have asked, \u201cWhat do these people want?\u201d

In the 1990s, the answers very fairly obvious. Affluent voters wanted tax rates held down, and they wanted their verdant suburban and trendy central city neighborhoods protected from violent crime and welfare dependency.

Led by Wisconsin\u2019s Tommy Thompson and New York\u2019s Rudy Giuliani, local Republicans and some Democrats cut violent crime and welfare rolls by more than half. In Washington, Newt Gingrich and Bill Clinton assisted and encouraged this process and largely froze tax rates.

Today\u2019s college graduates, more numerous than their 1994 predecessors and schooled on increasingly \u201cpolitically correct\u201d campuses, don\u2019t have such concrete goals. They\u2019re unfazed by marginal Obama-era tax increases and untroubled \u2014 so far, anyway \u2014 by the vertiginous increases in homicides after the May 25 incident in Minneapolis.

What they want out of politics is not so much anything concrete as it is symbolic: assertions of opposition to what they regard as America\u2019s \u201csystemic racism,\u201d and opposition to assertions of \u201cAmerica first,\u201d whether that means enforcement of immigration laws or \u201cxenophobic\u201d restrictions on travel from China, where COVID-19 originated.

In Democratic primaries, these voters, as I wrote in June, \u201cflitted from one candidate to the next, tilting toward Sen. Kamala Harris after she whacked Joe Biden for opposing busing in the 1970s, then luxuriating in Sen. Elizabeth Warren\u2019s stentorian assurances that, on every issue, \u2018I have a plan for that,\u2019 then swooning for the assured articulateness of then-South Bend Mayor Pete Buttigieg.\u201d

They seem chemically dependent on denunciations of Donald Trump, to the point that subscription- or ratings-hungry news media feel obliged to lard not just news accounts but even food pages and movie reviews with \u201cOrange Man Bad\u201d sneers. Trump is routinely described as a \u201cracist\u201d with no evidence cited.

White Democratic college graduates\u2019 central faith is that they oppose other Americans\u2019 systemic racism. Nearly a majority of them told pollsters they were bothered that Joe Biden is a white male in his 70s. Only about 30% of black and Hispanic Democrats feel the same, according to Pew. One group has more concern for ethnic origin and personal style than for real-life consequences for actual people.

White Democratic college graduates complain that Trump acts childishly; is impervious to criticism and fixated on symbolic trivia; and refuses to confess error or admit defeat. Fair criticism or self-description? Or both?

"}, {"id":"3e53d4a7-f885-5ea5-92a9-edfd03379882","type":"article","starttime":"1607779800","starttime_iso8601":"2020-12-12T06:30:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Gygi: Lack of trust in institutions running high","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/article_3e53d4a7-f885-5ea5-92a9-edfd03379882.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/gygi-lack-of-trust-in-institutions-running-high/article_3e53d4a7-f885-5ea5-92a9-edfd03379882.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/gygi-lack-of-trust-in-institutions-running-high/article_3e53d4a7-f885-5ea5-92a9-edfd03379882.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Gary Gygi","prologue":"The year 2020 is soon coming to a close, and it has been a doozy. Take your pick of disastrous events: COVID, economic weakness as a result of COVID, a raucous presidential election season that is still not resolved satisfactorily, riots, cities and businesses being burned, Americans being attacked by Marxist-trained thugs, fake news, forced mask mandates, quarantines and lockdowns, and the resultant closures of businesses, some of which may never reopen again.","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["american","presidential election","politics","democrats","conservative","city","millennial","joe biden"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"1297cfb4-7b63-57e0-8dd9-04949bddf6cd","description":"","byline":"","hireswidth":null,"hiresheight":null,"hiresurl":null,"presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"180","height":"225","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/29/1297cfb4-7b63-57e0-8dd9-04949bddf6cd/5f9338228540a.image.jpg?resize=180%2C225"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"125","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/29/1297cfb4-7b63-57e0-8dd9-04949bddf6cd/5f9338228540a.image.jpg?resize=100%2C125"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"375","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/29/1297cfb4-7b63-57e0-8dd9-04949bddf6cd/5f9338228540a.image.jpg"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"1280","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/1/29/1297cfb4-7b63-57e0-8dd9-04949bddf6cd/5f9338228540a.image.jpg"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"3e53d4a7-f885-5ea5-92a9-edfd03379882","body":"

The year 2020 is soon coming to a close, and it has been a doozy.

Take your pick of disastrous events: COVID, economic weakness as a result of COVID, a raucous presidential election season that is still not resolved satisfactorily, riots, cities and businesses being burned, Americans being attacked by Marxist-trained thugs, fake news, forced mask mandates, quarantines and lockdowns, and the resultant closures of businesses, some of which may never reopen again.

Some of these are legitimate crises, others not so much. But I want to talk to you about another crisis, one that is not a surprise to some of us. The crisis I am referring to is the utter lack of trust in most institutions, i.e., governments, private sector businesses both large and small, news media organizations, Hollywood and higher education.

I was born in the early 1960s and grew up in the \u201970s. During this time most Americans got their news from three broadcast news outlets and a newspaper. We tended to trust these organizations not because they earned our trust but because we didn\u2019t know any better and there weren\u2019t a lot of other alternatives. Radio talk shows didn\u2019t come along in force until the 1980s with Rush Limbaugh, the internet with everything available on it is a late \u201990s phenomenon. The genie is out of the bottle for better or worse, and it is not going back in. We know too much and have been misled too often.

I started studying the millennials about a decade ago and came to appreciate their outlook only in the last couple of years. Much has been made of the millennials and their narcissistic attitude of not liking anything or anyone who came before them. It took me a while to figure out why they think this way and then it hit me. They are a product of the Bush and Obama eras. They hated the Gulf wars and it turns out they were ahead of the curve on that one. They were told to go to college and then there would be a job waiting for them. The Obama years came and their jobs were not there, but they still had tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands of dollars of college debt. Can you blame them for not trusting what they have been told? They lived in their parents\u2019 basements and could not see a way out.

This negative outlook on life, while not healthy, is understandable. They felt they had been lied to and it was the fault of their parents and everyone older than them. Fortunately, this has begun to change as they have started to find careers, they have begun to get married, and buy homes \u2014 all things which they had put off. This lack of trust in organizations has now been transferred to a much larger and diverse group of Americans. Diverse in age, race, religion, anything you can name.

Again, this mistrust is not wrong, and it didn\u2019t start with President Trump \u2014 which means it won\u2019t end with him either. The 2016 presidential election enraged supporters of Sen. Bernie Sanders as they feel the primary and subsequent general election were stolen from him. By the way, they are not wrong.

The Trump administration years were the undoing for the mainstream news media. They used to be perceived as enablers for the Democratic Party. The Democrats would create a narrative, and the news media would pick it up and run with it, bias and all. Starting in 2016, the news media gave up any semblance of neutrality and became advocates for liberal causes. The news media became the Democratic Party\u2019s handlers as the news organizations now created the narratives and the Democrat politicians took and ran with it. Same process, different roles.

The 2020 presidential election may seem over, but I don\u2019t think it is. If a fraction of the fraud being alleged is true and not fixed with perpetrators being held accountable and going to jail, then at least 50-74 million Americans will not trust the election process perhaps ever again. The millennials\u2019 lack of trust in institutions is now half the American populace, and it is not going away.

President-elect Joe Biden is asking for unity. Conservatives will not burn down cities and businesses and attack our fellow Americans like we witnessed this summer, but we will not quietly submit to our leaders in government, big tech and media either.

The sleeping dog has awoken and the \u201csilent majority\u201d is enraged. Good luck with putting this genie back in the bottle.

"}, {"id":"4e2de5d2-5f01-5bb2-8771-7f0e38736164","type":"article","starttime":"1607607000","starttime_iso8601":"2020-12-10T06:30:00-07:00","priority":50,"sections":[{"local-guest-opinions":"news/opinion/local-guest-opinions"},{"columnists":"print-specific/columnists"}],"application":"editorial","title":"Guest opinion: The new gun rights","url":"http://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/article_4e2de5d2-5f01-5bb2-8771-7f0e38736164.html","permalink":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-the-new-gun-rights/article_4e2de5d2-5f01-5bb2-8771-7f0e38736164.html","canonical":"https://www.heraldextra.com/news/opinion/local-guest-opinions/guest-opinion-the-new-gun-rights/article_4e2de5d2-5f01-5bb2-8771-7f0e38736164.html","relatedAssetCounts":{"article":0,"audio":0,"image":1,"link":0,"vmix":0,"youtube":0,"gallery":0},"byline":"By Ryan W. Davis","prologue":"One takeaway from a tumultuous 2020 is that the Second Amendment and gun rights is a front and center issue once again. Academic philosophers \u2014 mostly \u2014 have long been suspicious of any asserted right to own firearms. I think the protests of 2020 help reveal what they\u2019ve missed. Start with the anti-gun argument. Philosophers have held that the mere fact of private possession of firearms makes all of us less free. Their argument has two steps. The first is that we are made less free not only when others interfere with us, but when they could (even if they don\u2019t). Imagine, for example, that my students \u2014 weary of attending my intro lectures \u2014 developed a sophisticated technology through which they could lock my office door from the outside. Even if they never saw fit to trap me in my office, the fact that they could would be scary enough on its own. When one person has the capacity to interfere with another at their whim, philosophers in the classical Republican tradition say the first dominates the second. And domination is a way of undermining freedom. A slave owner need not actively interfere; it\u2019s enough that they could interfere anytime. Fredrick Douglas said, \u201cIt was slavery \u2014 not its mere incidents \u2014 that I hated.\u201d","supportsComments":false,"commentCount":0,"keywords":["gun","philosopher","politics","sociology","weaponry","military","jeff mcmahan","second amendment","domination","show","right"],"internalKeywords":[],"customProperties":{},"presentation":null,"images":[{"id":"7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0","description":"","byline":"Stock Photo","hireswidth":4928,"hiresheight":3264,"hiresurl":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5da0a21a8960d.hires.jpg","presentation":"","versions":{"full":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1769","height":"1172","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=1769%2C1172"},"100": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"100","height":"66","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=100%2C66"},"300": {"type":"image/jpeg","width":"300","height":"199","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=300%2C199"},"1024":{"type":"image/jpeg","width":"1024","height":"678","url":"https://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/heraldextra.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/7/73/7731d76c-9ff4-5d94-b8ad-b35470dbc6e0/5fd141639c091.image.jpg?resize=1024%2C678"}}}],"revision":4,"commentID":"4e2de5d2-5f01-5bb2-8771-7f0e38736164","body":"

One takeaway from a tumultuous 2020 is that the Second Amendment and gun rights is a front and center issue once again. Academic philosophers \u2014 mostly \u2014 have long been suspicious of any asserted right to own firearms. I think the protests of 2020 help reveal what they\u2019ve missed.

Start with the anti-gun argument. Philosophers have held that the mere fact of private possession of firearms makes all of us less free. Their argument has two steps. The first is that we are made less free not only when others interfere with us, but when they could (even if they don\u2019t). Imagine, for example, that my students \u2014 weary of attending my intro lectures \u2014 developed a sophisticated technology through which they could lock my office door from the outside. Even if they never saw fit to trap me in my office, the fact that they could would be scary enough on its own. When one person has the capacity to interfere with another at their whim, philosophers in the classical Republican tradition say the first dominates the second. And domination is a way of undermining freedom. A slave owner need not actively interfere; it\u2019s enough that they could interfere anytime. Fredrick Douglas said, \u201cIt was slavery \u2014 not its mere incidents \u2014 that I hated.\u201d

The second step in the argument says that in a society of widespread firearm ownership, we all dominate each other. Picture the uneasiness of living in a Clint Eastwood movie. With everybody in town armed, we never know who might make the first move.

In an influential editorial, the philosopher Jeff McMahan wrote, \u201cWhen most citizens have the ability to kill anyone in their vicinity in an instant, everyone is less secure than they would be if no one had guns other than members of a democratically accountable police force.\u201d The result, he suggested, would be a \u201cWild West\u201d like society in which \u201cany lunatic\u201d could do violence to their fellow citizens.

Andreas T. Schmidt writes that in a society of mutual gun ownership, citizens are effectively \u201cthrown into intense power relationships with strangers.\u201d It\u2019s enough to terrify any drifter just passing through, even without an apprehensive Ennio Morricone score playing in the background.

I think the argument goes wrong in its second step. If the second step were right, we should expect citizens who know they mutually own firearms to approach each other with fear, anxiety and suspicion. But that is not what happens. There is no evidence that the gun-toting citizens of Wyoming feel dominated by each other more than the residents of gun-scarce Connecticut. In fact, something like the opposite is true. The sociology of gun ownership reveals that gun people really like each other, and encourage others to adopt their practices.

Academic philosophers may feel threatened by gun ownership, but that may say more about how they differ from other folks than it says about the conditions of a free society. The philosophers\u2019 argument has great optimism about the state\u2019s military and police forces\u2019 ability to counter private domination. But however often that premise holds, it\u2019s less than all the time.

Historians have noted that many NAACP leaders in Mississippi in the 1960s were armed, or relied on armed guards for protection. Faced with white vigilantism, the Deacons for Defense actively provided armed security for civil rights leaders and actions. Members of the Black Panthers quoted Patrick Henry and carried \u2014 in addition to weapons \u2014 copies of the Bill of Rights. There are times when private arms can help neutralize domination. As one civil rights leader observed, \u201cThe showing of a weapon stops many things.\u201d

The insight has a contemporary echo. In the wake of summer protests, the National African American Gun Owners\u2019 Association has seen a sudden acceleration in membership growth. African American gun owners have marched in Stone Mountain, Georgia, and in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. A New York Times headline describes gun shows as \u201cwhere \u2018Black Lives Matter\u2019 T-shirts meet MAGA hats.\u201d One Black Lives Matter chapter recently received national attention for its efforts to sponsor gun safety training for its members. The chapter\u2019s founder explained, \u201cWe need to be armed \u2026 the Second Amendment is our right, too.\u201d

They have a point. Political scientists have repeatedly found that residents of inner city urban areas are frequently denied their constitutionally assured protections.

I suspect skepticism about guns is as much a product of polarized thinking as reasoned argument. Associate gun rights with rural voters in the deep red parts of swing states, and it\u2019s easy to dismiss the pro-gun view as unhinged. Seeing how the reality cuts across political fault lines should give us pause. Maybe the civic argument for private firearms is not so crazy, after all.

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