×
×
homepage logo

Provo Power offers free trees but few residents respond

By Genelle Pugmire daily Herald - | Aug 31, 2018
1 / 8

Pat Davis, from Provo, picks out a Norway maple at the Trees for Energy Conservation event put on by Provo City Power on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo. Free trees are offered to Provo residents with central air-conditioning.

2 / 8

Knox Garfield, 4, points out the tree that his mother, Teri Garfield, selected during the Trees for Energy Conservation event at Provo City Power on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo.

3 / 8

Teri Garfield, from Provo, carries out Norwegian sunset maple at the Trees for Energy Conservation event at Provo City Power on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo.

4 / 8

Paul Brown, a Provo City Power employee, helps load a Norway Maple into Pat Davis' vehicle at the Trees for Energy Conservation event put on by Provo City Power on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo. Brown has been working the event for the past 17 years.

5 / 8

Attendees of the Trees for Energy Conservation event at Provo City Power select trees to take home on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo.

6 / 8

Pat Davis, from Provo, holds on to the Norway Maple that she selected during the Trees for Energy Conservation event at Provo City Power on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo.

7 / 8

Martzi Clark, 3, examines the tag on a mimosa tree at the Trees for Energy Conservation event at Provo City Power on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo.

8 / 8

An attendee of the Trees for Energy Conservation event carries a tree out on Thursday, Aug. 30, 2018, in Provo.

Provo residents with air conditioning in their homes but no trees outside to shade them were able to get a free tree through the yearly Trees for Energy Conservation program, though few took advantage of the offer.

According to Kat Linford, spokeswoman for Provo Power, not as many people came in to get their tree as in past years and there are a lot of trees just waiting for a home to shade.

Linford said the program is only for those who have air conditioning, because the No. 1 cause of a spike in electrical use on the power grid is directly related to the demand from air conditioning use.

“The offer is to help conserve energy overall,” Linford said in a press release. “When homes are shaded, it reduces the excessive need of using peaking (expensive) power. Customers who have swamp coolers or other means of cooling typically don’t have as high of a demand on the electrical grid during the peak times.”

Besides adding some green to homes, trees strategically placed around a yard can save some green too. As a locally-owned and locally-controlled utility, Provo City Power is interested in lowering costs to Provo consumers. Lower power bills save money, and help the utility reduce the need to purchase expensive power especially at peak times.

Linford noted that trees act as a natural air conditioner, reducing heat and reflection from the sun’s hot rays. This natural cooling happens as water evaporates from the leaf surfaces into the surrounding air. When the right tree is planted at the proper site, trees can be as beneficial as other energy saving home improvements including insulation, weather stripping, and shade screens.

Cooling costs can be reduced 30-50 percent by proper placement of trees around buildings, air conditioners and paved areas. Also, lawns shaded by trees use 30-50 percent less water, according to Linford.

When ready to plant, shade trees should not be planted any closer than 25-35 feet perpendicular to any power lines. Determine the shade tree’s width at maturity and plant the tree more than half that distance from the power lines, according to Provo City Power.

Approximately 20 different tree species were available to select from.

“The selection of trees offered by Provo City Power are proven to be the most appropriate for maximum cooling of your home if planted strategically,” Linford said in a press release.

All trees shed leaves, twigs, flowers or a fruiting structure at some time. There is no tree that is completely maintenance-free. Residents may view various tree species on the Provo City Forestry Division’s Tree Selection Guide at http://provopower.org/forestry.

For more information, call 801-852-6852.

Newsletter

Join thousands already receiving our daily newsletter.

I'm interested in (please check all that apply)